Monolid-shift

a collection of activism.

certain tagged posts can be found via the links on the left.

Note: if something is not credited, or has been mis-credited, please let me know via the "Ask Away."
safercampusdamnitdisney
4/27 23:42 - damnitdisney - 860 notes
pipeschapman

erosum:

Melissa Harris-Perry describes herself as “cis” (via “MSNBC Talks To And About Trans People For An Hour, Doesn’t F*ck It Up” on autostraddle)

4/26 03:11 - pipeschapman - 30,888 notes
msfashionashthesexuneducated
3/20 17:53 - thesexuneducated - 12,168 notes
riddikulusideasmajd3st1ny
2/28 01:02 - majd3st1ny - 40,396 notes
newwavefeminism

The 21 Most Lesbianish Cities in the US: The Autostraddle Guide →

newwavefeminism:

An interesting list of progressive and LGBT friendly cities lol

it goes into the climate and culture of different cities across the country, and most importantly it details what organizations & resources are available in each place.

I thought it could be a helpful guide =)

beautyinthebr0kenqueerspark

beautyinthebr0ken:

Thanks, Lauren!

thepostgrad:
This is a great resource in that it breaks down identity, orientation, expression, and sex into some basic components. 
Just like with any resource, there’s definitely room for improvement :]
Redefining Gender/Sexuality as a Constellation, Not a SpectrumI feel like looking at gender and sexuality as a spectrum is a bit limited. First, it polarizes the elementary understandings: man and woman, gay and straight, feminine and masculine, etc. By polarizing these concepts, it encourages a black/white/grey understanding of things. You’re either this, that or somewhere in between. 
The spectrum mechanic is a good starting point because it encourages understanding sexuality and gender as more expansive than black/white. However, it also places non-hetero, non-cis folks as in-betweens or as a gradation of the polar ends. 
For me, understanding gender and sexuality is about finding the relativity between these identities and how they shape the concept itself. This is why I say sexuality and gender are constellation concepts. Within each constellation concept, you have major and significant points (aka stars). Each of these stars—-gay, lesbian, intersex, asexual, pansexual, trans—-all mean something individually and relative to one another. 
For example, how does the definition of gay reshape itself when in conversation with intersex folks? Can it? What if it doesn’t? This itself encourages critical thinking. 
In addition, when you look the constellation conceptualization of sexuality and gender, it allows us to talk about these individual stars as being part of the greater, much more beautiful image. 
In other words, we all make a huge and fabulous starlight show in the sky. 
Including Others 
This is kinda obvious, but there’s no mention of pansexuals, asexuals, and the like on the spectrums. For someone that identifies as such (for example, me!), I can’t seem to find the “right” place to put pansexual on the sexual orientation line. Am I more leaning towards hetero? Homo? Bisexual? 
Maybe I’m so off-the-charts that I’m entirely different cookie. If so, totes down with that. 
—-
That’s all I can think of off the top of my head. 
Again, great resource! I just like to see an expanded version that’s more inclusive of our star-folks :] 

beautyinthebr0ken:

Thanks, Lauren!

thepostgrad:

This is a great resource in that it breaks down identity, orientation, expression, and sex into some basic components. 

Just like with any resource, there’s definitely room for improvement :]

Redefining Gender/Sexuality as a Constellation, Not a Spectrum

I feel like looking at gender and sexuality as a spectrum is a bit limited. First, it polarizes the elementary understandings: man and woman, gay and straight, feminine and masculine, etc. By polarizing these concepts, it encourages a black/white/grey understanding of things. You’re either this, that or somewhere in between. 

The spectrum mechanic is a good starting point because it encourages understanding sexuality and gender as more expansive than black/white. However, it also places non-hetero, non-cis folks as in-betweens or as a gradation of the polar ends. 

For me, understanding gender and sexuality is about finding the relativity between these identities and how they shape the concept itself. This is why I say sexuality and gender are constellation concepts. Within each constellation concept, you have major and significant points (aka stars). Each of these stars—-gay, lesbian, intersex, asexual, pansexual, trans—-all mean something individually and relative to one another. 

For example, how does the definition of gay reshape itself when in conversation with intersex folks? Can it? What if it doesn’t? This itself encourages critical thinking. 

In addition, when you look the constellation conceptualization of sexuality and gender, it allows us to talk about these individual stars as being part of the greater, much more beautiful image. 

In other words, we all make a huge and fabulous starlight show in the sky. 

Including Others 

This is kinda obvious, but there’s no mention of pansexuals, asexuals, and the like on the spectrums. For someone that identifies as such (for example, me!), I can’t seem to find the “right” place to put pansexual on the sexual orientation line. Am I more leaning towards hetero? Homo? Bisexual? 

Maybe I’m so off-the-charts that I’m entirely different cookie. If so, totes down with that. 

—-

That’s all I can think of off the top of my head. 

Again, great resource! I just like to see an expanded version that’s more inclusive of our star-folks :] 

2/1 22:36 - queerspark - 91 notes
cdandorq-squared
cdandor:

Words that Hurt poster for the UC Davis Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Resource Center. Displayed for Principles of Community week in the Memorial Union until March 14th, 2011.

cdandor:

Words that Hurt poster for the UC Davis Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender Resource Center. Displayed for Principles of Community week in the Memorial Union until March 14th, 2011.

2/1 00:55 - q-squared - 10,700 notes
wikihow.comsafercampus

“The word “transgender” is an adjective, and a descriptive word; not a noun or a verb. Just as you wouldn’t call an older person “an old” or say they are “olded”, it is inappropriate to refer to a transgender person as “a transgender” without adding “person”, “woman”, “man”, or any other appropriate noun.”

How to Respect a Transgender Person

1/28 03:58 - safercampus - 1,817 notes
livelaughawesometumblinfeminist

tumblinfeminist:

Things so basic they shouldn’t even need to be said!

1/21 03:54 - tumblinfeminist - 17,067 notes
newwavefeminism

newwavefeminism:

Shit Girls Say to Gay Guys

by Nick/Nicola Foti

youtube.com

It’s time. (by getupaustralia)

via Advocate.com:

GetUp! in Australia released a commercial on Thursday from the perspective of one half of a gay couple in love. It builds to the big moment that they want legalized — a proposal to get married.

Polls in Australia show support for marriage equality has increased to almost two-thirds of voters. But Prime Minister Julia Gillard remains opposed, arguing that “the institution of marriage has come to have a particular meaning and standing in our culture and nation and that should continue unchanged.”

In the commercial, the couple seems like any other that might fit that “meaning,” except for their gender. Groups such as The Third Way in Washington have argued based on new research that it’s a message of commitment like this one — and not about benefits or rights — that will be most effective with voters.

ragstoreverie
1/4 21:34 - ragstoreverie - 50,895 notes
kfffunk
kfffunk:

hi

kfffunk:

hi

1/4 01:22 - kfffunk - 3,481 notes
shashcamerathesexuneducated

thesexuneducated:

shashcamera:

Creative Collaborative with Luam and Janaya

inspired by Sister Souljah but not in the way you would think. 

Really beautiful. 

1/3 21:10 - thesexuneducated - 4,812 notes